Faulty Reasoning

There is a reason for everything. If you are feeling fine, you will have a good reason to feel that way. If you are feeling miserable, you will have a good reason to feel that way too.   When you are suffering from anxiety or depression, your moods and your reasons are so mixed up that it becomes difficult to trust your reasoning. Even though you can’t trust your reason, you can trust your mood. You can trust that you feel miserable, but the reason why you feel miserable is open to debate. If you have managed to think yourself into a miserable situation, you can think your way out or you can unthink your way out.

To think your way out of a mood, you look at your reasons for your mood and you refute them. To convince yourself that you can refute very believable reasons, you have to look at yourself. Remind yourself that you are capable of feeling better and deserve to feel better. Place full blame for your mood on the faulty reasoning, then go about dismantling the reasons. You can do this in your head, on a piece of paper, with a friend or with a therapist. Understand that there is always another way of looking at your circumstances.

To unthink your way out of your mood, you still have to look at yourself. Remind yourself that you are capable of feeling better and deserve to feel better. Then, focus on your breathing. Breathe in peace and compassion and breathe out misery. When your reasons try to interfere with your breathing, just breathe them out with your misery. Don’t rush your mood away, but experience the world through the mood. Hear the sounds around you. Smell the scents in the air. Taste the food and drink. As your mood tries to carry you away again with all its good reasons, don’t believe them, just breathe through them.

When your mood passes, you can check in with your reason again. If the reasons feel wrong, check in with your breath again. That’s reasonable.

 

 

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